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Churchill Airport – Rehabilitation of Airport Runways


Project Details

Location: Churchill, MB.
Client: Public Works and Government Services Canada
Completed: September 2011

Project Description

The work covered the;
  • Removal and profiling of existing asphalt pavement by rotary milling
  • Removing existing concrete pavement
  • Asphalt lower and surface course resurfacing with new hot mix asphaltic concrete
  • Adjusting all runway, taxiway, and apron edge lighting
  • New pavement markings

Key Challenges and Solutions

Remoteness
Churchill is a small town of 900 located along the shores of Hudson Bay in Northern Manitoba. Reachable by sea, air, and rail only, mobilizing an entire workforce and all related equipment proved to be challenging.

In consultation with various partners and stakeholders, NRC ensured that with proper planning and execution all required equipment was mobilized to site on time in one single rail drop.

Weather
The construction season is short in Manitoba, and even shorter in Churchill. A typical window to complete paving works would be from 10 to 12 weeks from June to August. Some of the materials incorporated on this project had been produced the season prior and were still frozen upon our arrival.

NRC used various techniques including the use of steam to ensure these materials were thawed and ready for use when needed.

Wildlife
As everyone knows, Churchill is known as the Polar Bear capital of the world. These large majestic animals spend the summers on land waiting for the sea ice to form before they can go out and hunt. During this time, they are quite hungry and can be seen roaming around the community in search of anything to eat.

NRC teamed up with local wildlife officials and set up strategically positioned bear traps to prevent them from wandering to close to the jobsite and endangering both themselves and our workers.